Successful obliteration of troublesome and chronically draining cavities

Geerse, S. et al. (2017) The Journal of Laryngology & Otology. 131(2) pp. 138-143

This study aimed to evaluate the results of revision radical cavity surgery with mastoid obliteration using a standardised grading scheme.

A retrospective study was performed of 121 patients (122 ears) with chronically draining ears who underwent revision radical cavity surgery with mastoid obliteration between 2007 and 2013. Surgical indications, patient characteristics, pre- and post-operative Merchant grade, and surgical outcomes were recorded. The main outcome measures were presence of a dry ear, time for complete re-epithelialisation, presence of residual or recurrent disease, and need for revision surgery.

In the 5-year follow-up group (n = 31), dry ears were found in 97 per cent after 6 minor revisions and cholesteatoma-free ears were found in 97 per cent. In the total cohort, dry ears were found in 93 per cent after nine revisions and cholesteatoma-free ears were found in 98 per cent. The median time for complete re-epithelialisation was eight weeks. There were no major complications.

In terms of the dry ear rate, residual cholesteatoma and time to complete epithelialisation, revision radical cavity surgery with mastoid obliteration produces very good results in concordance with published results, despite most patients suffering from very troublesome cavities prior to surgery.

Read the abstract here

 

The effects of surgery type and different ossiculoplasty materials on the hearing results in cholesteatoma surgery

Şevik Eliçora, S. et al. (2017) European Archives of Otorhinolaryngol. 274(2) pp. 773–780

To investigate the effects of surgery type [intact canal wall (ICW) or canal wall down (CWD) mastoidectomy] and different ossiculoplasty materials on hearing outcome in single-staged cholesteatoma surgery.

Although the use of the malleus as an APORP was found to be less effective than other autografts, the degree of advantage of using the incus, malleus, cortical bone, and cartilage did not significantly differ between materials (p = 0.152). Despite the effects of the incus, malleus, and cortical bone not differing in terms of the postoperative ABG (p = 0.160), incus usage was highly beneficial for hearing gain (p = 0.009). Despite CWD tympanoplasty affecting all frequencies, it has a particularly negative effect on the hearing threshold at 1000 Hz. In patients with partial ossicular replacement, autogenous grafts are more successful in restoring hearing at high frequencies, particularly at 4000 Hz. Although autogenous materials do not differ in terms of partial replacement effectiveness, the incus has been shown to be most effective for total replacement.

Read the full abstract here